2023 Conference Session Descriptions

Times listed in CST. Dates and times subject to change

Preconference Workshops

Wednesday, October 25 | 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM (FULL DAY - 6 CE)

  1. Surviving and Thriving as a New Director: An Introductory Leadership Institute (An Elements of Excellence Program) VIEW
  2. Student Support Workshop: The Role of the Counseling Center Director on the BIT/CARE Team and in Providing Violence Risk Assessments VIEW

Wednesday, October 25 | 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM (AM HALF DAY - 3 CE)

  1. Getting Back to Basics 2.0: Moving Beyond Fire Fighting to Actually LEADing Your Center (An Elements of Excellence Program) VIEW
  2. An innovative, evidence-based system of care to address comorbidities on college campuses: The CETA Approach VIEW
  3. Evaluating Co-Responder Programs for Mental Health Crisis Intervention: Lessons Learned and Future Directions VIEW
  4. Serving Student Athletes in a World of Pressure VIEW

Wednesday, October 25 | 1:00 AM - 4:00 PM (PM HALF DAY - 3 CE)

  1. Serving Student Veterans and Service Members on Campus VIEW
  2. Cultural Humility in College Counseling VIEW
  3. Finding your Compass: Information, Guidance, and Support for Selecting Wrap Around Mental Health Services VIEW
  4. Getting Comfortable with Data: A hands on experience of using information to inform and advocateARE Teams VIEW

Breakout Sessions

Thursday, October 26 | 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM (1.5 CE)

  1. Elements of Excellence - Leadership 101: How to Feel Like a Badass Director VIEW
  2. Exhaustion (in its Various Forms) and Hypofrontality as Primary Factors for Suicidality VIEW
  3. Grant Writing: What, like it's hard? VIEW
  4. MINDful College Connections: An Innovative, Partnership Approach to Student Mental Health VIEW
  5. Reclaiming the narrative of college counseling: Ethical considerations while implementing a Comprehensive Collaborative Care Model VIEW
  6. Rural Mental Health VIEW
  7. The Power in Being a Director: Finding Comfort in Your Role VIEW
  8. We survived and so will you: How two BIPOC women navigated the first year as new directors at PWIs VIEW

Friday, October 27 | 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM (1.5 CE)

  1. Elements of Excellence - Leadership 102: Leading from All Sides VIEW
  2. Becoming a Comprehensive Trauma Informed Care Counseling Center: A Case Study VIEW
  3. From the Training Director to the Director Lens: How the evolving landscape of college mental health impacts doctoral internship training VIEW
  4. Holding Space: Leading a Staff Team through Transition VIEW
  5. Thriving, DEI Climate, and Staff Retention in College Counseling Centers: Do Training Programs Make a Difference? VIEW
  6. Understanding the IACS Standards and the Benefits of IACS Accreditation in Collegiate Mental Health VIEW
  7. What Are Your Best Tips? - Exchanging Survive and Thrive Strategies for Counseling Service Directors and Centers VIEW

Saturday, October 28 | 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM (1.5 CE)

  1. Elements of Excellence - Leadership 103: Supervising and Co-creating Center Culture for Staff Stability VIEW
  2. Director Self-Care with Comics VIEW
  3. HCH Program: Practical Considerations for Recruitment and Retention of Clinicians of Minoritized Identities VIEW
  4. Helping a campus recover after a student dies by suicide VIEW
  5. Pivot to Mental Health Case Management on Campus: Expectations for High Touch Student Experience and Wraparound Services VIEW
  6. Promoting Mental Health through Enterprise-Wide Suicide Prevention Strategic Framework: A Health Promoting University Initiative VIEW
  7. Staff Meetings: The Power (and Opportunity) is in Our Hands VIEW

Saturday, October 28 | 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM (1.5 CE)

  1. Elements of Excellence - Postvention in Context: Translating Best Practices in Postvention to the Unique Needs of Each Suicide Response VIEW
  2. Controlling the Narrative by Working with the Media VIEW
  3. Emeritus Program: Going Back in Service of the Future: Emeriti Perspectives on Counseling Centers' Path Forward During this time of Transition and Change in our Profession VIEW
  4. Highlights from the 2021-2022 AUCCCD Directors' Survey VIEW
  5. IACS Site Visitor Training VIEW
  6. Money, Money, Money: The ABBA's (or ABC's) of Financial Literacy for Non-Financially Oriented Directors VIEW
  7. Preventing Staff Burnout: Organizational Strategies, Therapeutic Presence, and Inclusive Culture VIEW

Sunday, October 29 | 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM (1.5 CE)

  1. Elements of Excellence - Operationalizing Equity into Counseling Center Work: Challenges, Opportunities & “Successes” VIEW
  2. A Year in Review: What I wish I Knew During my First Year as Director VIEW
  3. Disrupting the Grind - Finding Liberation through Rest VIEW
  4. The Psychology of Stalking: A discussion of Stalker Types and Interventions VIEW
  5. The Role of the Counseling Center in Leading and Supporting Population-Level University-Wide Mental Health Promotion and Support: A Health Promoting University Approach VIEW

Sunday, October 29 | 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM (1.5 CE)

  1. Elements of Excellence - Too Many Cooks in the Kitchen: Best Practices Around Managing Outside Partners/ Resources VIEW
  2. Developing Secure Teams VIEW
  3. Navigating Chronic Health Conditions as Counseling Center Directors: Ethical Considerations VIEW
  4. Please Don't Call Us Superheroes: Avoiding the Trap of Mission Based Gaslighting VIEW
  5. Seeing Through the Numbers: Using data to decrease wait times and increase staff wellness regardless of utilization rates and size of staff VIEW

Surviving and Thriving as a New Director: An Introductory Leadership Institute (An Elements of Excellence Program)

Summary of Proposal: This full-day Introductory Leadership Institute is designed for directors in the early stages of their directorship (one day to three years) and will address leadership development and management issues. The Institute is comprised of four modules: cultivating your style, strengths and values as a leader, examining the multiple roles of directorship and how to best manage these roles, a roundtable discussion on administrative/management issues (budget, personnel, stakeholders, power dynamics, DEI practices), and a senior directors panel to share lessons learned. The overarching goals of the Introductory Leadership Institute are to provide an opportunity for directors in the early stages of their careers to develop supportive connections with their peers and to cultivate an understanding of the skills and challenges involved in leading a College/University Counseling Center.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore and define personal leadership styles, strengths and values in the context of being a counseling center director.
  • Analyze personal, institutional, and systemic dilemmas and complexities associated with leading a counseling center in this day and age.
  • Identify and clarify the multiple roles (at times conflicting roles) that are associated with being a CC director.
  • Ask and discuss administrative/managerial dilemmas that new directors may find challenging. (budget, personnel, stakeholders, power dynamics, DEI practices),
  • Gain perspective through hearing about lessons learned from seasoned directors.

Presenters: Jeffrey Ng, Fordham University (15,001 - 20,000); ValaRay Irvin, Southern University and A&M College (5,001 - 7,500); Karen R. Hofman, University of Central Florida (45,001+); Frances S. Diaz, University of California - Irvine (35,001 - 45,000); Karen Singleton, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (10,001 - 15,000); Caroline Tomekowou, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (5,001 - 7,500); Rich Yoakum, Samford University (5,001 - 7,500); Cary Bosak, Sarah Lawrence College (1,501 - 5,000)


Student Support Workshop: The Role of the Counseling Center Director on the BIT/CARE Team and in Providing Violence Risk Assessments

CE Hours: Full Day (6 CE)
Description: The role of BIT/CARE Teams (BITs) on campuses continues to evolve and play a pivotal role in the prevention of both violence toward others and suicide risk. As both suicidality and gun violence among college students rises, BITs play an active role in prevention and support. These multidisciplinary teams should include a mental health professional as nearly 75% of cases discussed by BITs involve a psychological component as well as a behavioral issue. Given the challenges presented by nuanced cases such as psychiatric hospitalizations, disruptive or threatening behavior impacted by a mental health issue or disability, or students requiring significant wraparound care, counseling center directors often struggle to provide adequate connection to care while also assisting the college in responding to the student’s behavior. This session will provide a practical workshop for increasing counseling center directors’ ability to serve collaboratively on the BIT to assist in responding to student behavior while also providing effective support to students. Presenters will provide an overview of BITs, define the role of the counselor and the BIT in providing violence risk assessments, discuss ethical and legal concerns, and discuss lessons learned from recent cases related to treatment, ADA protections, and due process.

Presenter(s):
Scott Strader, Psychologist, University of South Florida; Linda Abbott, Consultant at TNG Consulting

Topic(s):
  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Ethics / Law
  • Outreach Programming / Prevention
  • Suicide Prevention
  • Violence

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Learning Objectives:

  1. Define the role of the counselor on the BIT/CARE team
  2. Explain how the counseling center director can participate collaboratively and holistically in responding to student mental health and behavioral issues 
  3. Apply ethical and legal considerations to complicated cases involving both a student disciplinary and mental health component
  4. Discuss the different types of assessments used to assess the risk of harm to others.
  5. Explain the role of mental health professionals in assessing the risk of potential harm to others.
  6. Describe the role confidentiality, privacy, and privilege for counselors serving on BIT/CARE teams.

Getting Back to Basics 2.0: Moving Beyond Fire Fighting to Actually LEADing Your Center (An Elements of Excellence Program)
Mid-Level Directors’ Institute

The first few years of directorship often entail much fire fighting: hopping from crisis to crisis and stamping out fires as they come up, leaving little time for thoughtful, intentional, planned leadership. After a few years of this, most directors have adjusted to their firefighting roles and are ready (and needing) to spend time purposefully leading their centers. Thoughtful decisions must be made around mission, vision, and values; scope of service; resource requests and allocation; data collection and utilization; communication and marketing; strategic planning; and sustainability; all intersecting within the context of the University/town/state in which the center exists. This three hour Mid-Level Directors’ Institute will explore these topics in depth, helping MLDs cultivate their own sense of empowerment and agency to shape the direction in which their centers are going, rather than just hanging on for dear life. Trauma stewardship, change management, the clinical alignment model, and management vs. leadership will be explored as foundational concepts underlying this phase of our college counseling center directorship.

Learning Objectives:
1. Examine the concept of trauma stewardship and how that applies to our roles as mid-level directors
2. Describe the clinical alignment model and explore implications of this in your own clinic
3. Identify next steps in at least two major areas that need attention in your clinic

Instructional Level: Intermediate 

Presenters: Melissa L. Rotkiewicz, University of Massachusetts (30,001 - 35,000); Karen R. Hofmann, University of Central Florida (45,001+); Frances S. Diaz, University of California - Irvine (35,001 - 45,000); Erin Trujillo, Arizona State University (45,001+); Erin N. Vlach, Emeritus


An innovative, evidence-based system of care to address comorbidities on college campuses: The CETA Approach
CE Hours: Half Day (3 CE)

Description: Numerous studies show that student mental health is worsening and near a crisis. There are multiple challenges with our mental health care system such as access, stress on the job, long wait lists, and comorbid conditions. The strain on college counseling centers is significant and real. Providers must be able to assess, triage and treat an extremely wide range of problems. Unfortunately, most evidence-based treatments focus on a single disorder.

The Common Elements Treatment Approach (CETA; www.ceta-global.com) is an evidence-based, innovative system of care that has been found to be highly effective in reducing a wide range of mental and behavioral health problems such as depression, anxiety, trauma, violence, substance abuse, and risky behaviors. CETA allows a provider to use an evidence-based protocol to treat the comorbidities with precision-based care. This pre-institute training is a unique opportunity for college campus counselors to learn about a cutting-edge treatment that is well studied. We will review how CETA was developed and the research behind it. The training will also include a review of the elements in CETA, how they are put together to treat comorbid conditions and different severities, and ultimately how this solves barriers to access and quality treatment.


Presenter(s):
Laura Murray, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Caleb Figge, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health


Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Diversity, Equity & Inclusive Excellence
  • Effects of COVID-19
  • Mental Health Trends
  • Self-care / Wellbeing
  • Suicide Prevention
  • Violence
  • Trauma

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the CBT elements that make up the Common Elements Treatment Approach.
  • Cite the evidence of effectiveness of CETA.
  • Describe how the CETA System of Care can alleviate some of the challenges with our current mental health care system.

Evaluating Co-Responder Programs for Mental Health Crisis Intervention: Lessons Learned and Future Directions
CE Hours: Half Day (3 CE)

Description: Behavioral Health Crisis units that pair law enforcement/campus security with mental health clinics is an emerging practice with over a dozen campuses launching programing in the last two to three years. These programs have been developed utilizing existing models in cities across the country. This pre-conference will be led by counseling center directors and university administrators who have developed co-responder programs with counselors and police/security personnel as campus first responders to students experiencing a mental health crisis. The purpose of this workshop is to review different frameworks of co-responder programs that have been developed and implemented by peer institutions utilizing both staff clinicians and graduate trainees. The workshop will focus on evaluating program utilization and effectiveness; benefits and barriers of having a co-responder program; and valuable lessons learned from implementing these programs.

Presenter(s):
Ahmed Ghuman, Psy.D., Psychologist, University of Pittsburgh


Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Diversity, Equity & Inclusive Excellence
  • Ethics / Law
  • Leadership / Management
  • Mental Health Trends
  • Suicide Prevention
  • Trauma

Instructional Level: Advanced

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore various frameworks and benefits of co-responder programs that have been developed and implemented by peer institutions utilizing both staff clinicians and graduate trainees.
  • Share barriers and challenges with suggested strategies for developing and implementing a successful program.
  • Analyze metrics of success for program evaluation and explore ways to use data in informing appropriate program changes.

Serving Student Athletes in a World of Pressure
CE Hours: Half Day (3 CE)

Description: Professional gymnast and Olympian, Simone Biles, professional swimmer and Olympian, Michael Phelps, past Ohio State University football player Harry Miller, and professional skier and Olympian Lindsey Vonn are among numerous professional and college athletes that have spoken out about pressure and mental health concerns experienced as athletes. Some athletes are sometimes made out to be “superhuman,” when they are humans that make mistakes, have stressful life experiences, and have emotions and feelings like all humans.

College athletes, most of whose brains are still developing and becoming more intricately wired, are often faced with numerous pressures and responsibilities. Keeping a good grade point average, attending classes, attending athletic practices and team meetings, attending booster and community events, being good examples, and making plays on the court or field are often expectations of student-athletes. Colleges and universities need to have specific mental health services and programming for student-athletes that focus on mental health, mental performance, stress management, and assisting student-athletes with identity and personal development.

This session will educate participants about student athlete mental health needs, standards of care, and will outline the Be HERD Mental Wellness and Performance Program at Marshall University and how it is beneficial for student athletes.


Presenter(s):
Candace Layne, EdD, Marshall University; Olivia Woody, MS, Sports Psychology, Marshall University; Ryan Majher, Marshall University


Topic(s):
  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Mental Health Trends
  • Outreach Programming / Prevention
  • Other - Write In: Student athlete mental health


Instructional Level: Introductory

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify and design programming including specific NCAA standards of mental health care for student athletes.
  • Evaluate specific data and research related to student athlete mental health, approaches, and scope of care for colleges and universities.
  • Examine at least three strategies that are beneficial in assisting student athlete mental health and attendees will develop a toolkit of programming and strategies to take back to their home colleges and universities.

Serving Student Veterans and Service Members on Campus
CE Hours: Half Day (3 CE)

Description: This full-day core competency program is designed to address cultural and clinical concerns of Veterans and Service members on a university or college campus. The morning begins with a review of military-specific events that can impact Service members and Veterans and their experiences as students, followed by a discussion of potential challenges to military connected students accessing services on campus. It engages participants to think about specific campus outreach activities and ways they can advocate for military connected students on campus. The second half of the workshop focuses on clinical issues on campus. Attendees will develop a better understanding of common social stressors for service-connected students and ways they can assist. Attendees also will be better able to identify common clinical presentations with which Service members and Veterans present to university counseling centers and ways that they can provide support and effective, culturally-competent treatment. Clinical presentations discussed include post-traumatic stress disorder, sleep problems, depression, substance use disorders, chronic pain, suicide and traumatic brain injury. Included throughout is a focus on cultural competence specific to working with military connected clients that prepares the learner with a clearer understanding of how to engage with military connected students.

Presenter(s):
Kevin Holloway, PhD - Clinical Psychology, Psychologist, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), Center for Deployment Psychology (CDP)

Kevin M. Holloway, Ph.D., is a licensed clinical psychologist working as Director, Online Training, Technology, and Telehealth (OT3) at the Center for Deployment Psychology (CDP) and Assistant Professor of Medical and Clinical Psychology at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland. In this capacity, he leads a team of subject matter experts and support staff to develop and present workshops across the world to military and civilian audiences on topics in deployment behavioral health and evidence-based therapies for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Additionally, he leads a team of mental health subject matter experts and technology experts to develop and disseminate technology solutions to improve access to and quality of professional training. This team was recognized as Gold Medal winners in the International Serious Play Awards 2019 for Operation AVATAR and Bronze Medal winners in the International Serious Play Awards 2020 for Build a Bedroom, both interactive provider training environments in Second Life. Dr. Holloway received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Brigham Young University in 2004, and completed his doctoral internship at the Portland, Oregon Veterans Administration hospital. Prior to joining CDP, Dr. Holloway worked at the Department of Defense's National Center for Telehealth and Technology, where he led the Center's Virtual Worlds Program which explored the use of shared virtual environments for immersive, interactive patient education, provider training, and telemental health applications. The program was recognized as a Computerworld Honors Laureate in 2012 for the T2 Virtual PTSD Experience. Dr. Holloway also led or contributed to projects investigating virtual reality exposure (VRE) therapy to treat PTSD, training providers in using VRE, gaming motivation for health applications, and video teleconferencing for telemental health. Earlier in his career, Dr. Holloway was a staff psychologist at Madigan Army Medical Center, providing care to active-duty soldiers with an emphasis on combat-related PTSD and other anxiety disorders.


Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Diversity, Equity & Inclusive Excellence
  • Ethics / Law
  • Outreach Programming / Prevention
  • Trauma

Instructional Level: Introductory

Learning Objectives:

  • Characterize deployment cycle stressors as they manifest in student Veterans and Service members.
  • Develop recommendations designed to enhance student outreach opportunities specific to student Veterans and Service members to improve clinical and academic outcomes.
  • Describe common clinical presentations of student Veterans and Service members in college and university counseling centers.

Cultural Humility in College Counseling
CE Hours: Half Day (3 CE)

Description: Creating an effective therapeutic connection often involves sensitivity to the perceived and actual cultural similarities and differences between counselors and clients. In recent decades our understanding has shifted away from striving for cultural competency to approaching interactions with a sense of greater humility. Cultural Humility was initially proposed by Melanie Tervalon and Jann Murray-García in 1998 as a model for medical training that “incorporates a lifelong commitment to selfevaluation and self-critique, to redressing the power imbalances in the patient-physician dynamic.” Cultural humility is a necessity to successfully navigate the complexities of working with intersection of identities among increasingly diverse student populations. We would like to offer this workshop to explore what we mean by cultural humility in practice and how, where, and when we struggle with humility instead of walking into the counseling room with fewer assumptions. We would offer experiential practices for participants to reflect on their own sense of cultural humility to set up the stage for later discussion of vignettes from our experiences to highlight the applicability of cultural humility to counseling settings that have become increasingly pluralistic and multicultural. Ethical and legal complexities as related to cultural context would be examined throughout the discussion and vignettes.

Presenter(s):
Mahnaz Mousavi, PhD, Psychologist, Georgetown University in Qatar; Juanita Martin, PhD, University of Akron; Steve Wilson, Texas A&M University in Qatar


Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Diversity, Equity & Inclusive Excellence

Instructional Level: Advanced

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore the concept of humility across cultures in counseling context and its applicability to diverse college and university student populations.
  • Explore intersectionality of identities among diverse student populations in the U.S. and American universities outside the U.S. and how it plays out in counselor/student dyads from similar or divergent cultural identities and backgrounds.
  • Examine vignettes of real counseling dyads to stimulate discussion, reactions and sharing of expertise, while considering potential clashes between cultural context and ethical standards.

Finding your Compass: Information, Guidance, and Support for Selecting Wrap Around Mental Health Services
CE Hours: Half Day (3 CE)

Description: Given the higher acuity of mental health concerns in students and increased demand for mental health services on campus, many campus counseling centers are looking for additional resources to help them support their students. This presentation will review different types of adjunct and wraparound services that are available, how to assess which service will be most beneficial, and how to partner with these third-party providers to streamline referrals, communication, and treatment transitions in conjunction with the guidance from AUCCCD’s Navigating a Path Forward for Mental Health Services in Higher Education (Gorman, Walden, Braun, & Hotaling, 2023). Hear from mental health professionals with experience working in college counseling, outpatient treatment, and higher levels of care about how to optimize relationships with third-party wraparound services to improve mental health for students and alleviate stress and decrease burnout for campus providers.

Presenter(s):
Tricia Besett-Alesch, PhD, University of Nebraska - Lincoln; Casey Tallent, ERC Pathlight; Wendy Mathes, ERC Pathlight


Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Diversity, Equity & Inclusive Excellence
  • Leadership / Management
  • Mental Health Trends
  • Outreach Programming / Prevention
  • Self-care / Wellbeing
  • Other - Write In: Wrap Around Services

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain the differences among wraparound care providers for campus mental health
  • Identify instances where each type may be meeting the needs of campus mental health teams, aligning with the campus mental health services strategy
  • Detail how to partner with third party vendors who provide wrap around care for students, defining processes to integrate protocols into campus mental health practice

Getting Comfortable with Data: A hands on experience of using information to inform and advocateARE Teams
CE Hours: Half Day (3 CE)

Description: The ability to find useful data and tell a meaningful story that leads to beneficial outcomes is part science and part art. This preconference will focus on how to “mine” and then effectively use data to inform new directions for your center and campus & to advocate for additional resources and assistance. The presenters will work in real time using an example given from the audience to engage and guide audience members in the steps to locating, analyzing and reporting data to tell a story.

Presenter(s):
David Walden, PhD, Hamilton College; Kim Gorman, PhD, Western Carolina University; Lynn Brawn, MA, SUNY Oswego; Cindy Bruns, PhD, Central Washington University


Topic(s):

  • Leadership / Management
  • Mental Health Trends
  • Political / Advocacy

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Learning Objectives:

  • List at least 4 sources of potential data that could be used to help inform and advocate
  • Assess what data communication strategies are appropriate for specific circumstances
  • Apply information learned to your own institution's needs and priorities

Elements of Excellence - Leadership 101: How to Feel Like a Badass Director
1.5 CE Hours

Description: The challenges of directing a college counseling center are well documented (Gorman et al., 2022; Chin, Singleton, Juarez, 2021).  How do you lead effectively in the midst of all of the challenges?  How do you remind yourself of the strengths and qualities you already have that can be used to do the work?  Come to this process-oriented workshop to get in touch with your inner badass.  Learn more about how to dare to lead (Brown, 2018) through the concepts of Brene Brown’s Dare to Lead book.  Develop the capacity to separate yourself from your work.  Manage your work instead of having your work manage you. Hear lessons learned through the experiences of 3 Directors with their own specific challenges. This is the first session of the E of E leadership series.

Presenter(s):

  • Calvin Chin, Princeton University (7,500 - 10,000)
  • Karen Hofmann, University of Central Florida 45,001+
  • Caroline Tomekowou, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Worcester Campus Under 1,500

Topic(s): Leadership / Management

Instructional Level: Introductory

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will get in touch with their inner badass.
  • Participants will learn how to apply the principles of Daring to Lead to their work as counseling center directors.
  • Participants will learn strategies to develop better work/life balance.

Exhaustion (in its Various Forms) and Hypofrontality as Primary Factors for Suicidality
1.5 CE Hours

Description: There exists a significant gap in the contemporary conversation about suicide among the professional fields within mental health services. This session will explore the critical role that the many forms of exhaustion and fatigue (e.g., chronic or acute sleep deprivation, high performance cycles, physical and mental exhaustion, recovery or lack thereof, have upon the onset of suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Participants will be introduced to the strong correlation between poor sleep quality, nighttime wakefulness, nightmares, and the research linking it to suicidality. The session will also explore the neurophysiology of cortisol spirals, hypofrontality and the central role that they play in suicidal ideation. The session will then offer suggestions for application when working with college students.

Presenter(s):

  • Timothy Silvestri, Muhlenberg College (1,501 - 2,500)

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Outreach Programming / Prevention
  • Self-care / Wellbeing
  • Suicide Prevention

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Learning Objective(s):

  1. Attendees will be able to identify the prominent neurophysiological factors associated with acute and chronic stress and how they may be primary contributors to suicidality.
  2. Attendees will be able to identify 3-5 factors that may contribute to acute or chronic sleep deprivation, how to assess for them in a clinical session, and how they are primary contributors to suicidality.
  3. Attendees will be able to describe the five elements of a cortisol spiral and its influences on suicidality, mood, anxiety, and performance.

From the Training Director to the Director Lens: How the evolving landscape of college mental health impacts doctoral internship training
1.5 CE Hours

Description: This session features a panel of former training directors (now directors) that have a passion for training, and yet face difficult decisions regarding training due to the current challenges faced by counseling centers.  Topics discussed include the challenges of recruiting and retaining supervisors, difficult interns who create even more cohesion and morale issues, and the potential impact on the future of training and staffing in counseling centers. University counseling centers have a long history of viewing the training of new professionals as a key element of a center's mission, accounting for 20% of APPIC doctoral internship sites.  Additionally, the 2022 AUCCCD Annual Survey reported that 78.1% of centers indicated difficulties in recruiting for open positions and the average applicant pool for doctoral positions was only 3.3.  This is creating a shortfall in doctoral level staff supervisors required by APA in centers with doctoral internship programs. Sites are having to consider pausing their internship programs, reducing the number of slots, or even terminating them all together. Considering the past crisis of internship imbalance, the elimination of a significant number of UCCs offering internships could recreate that scenario and additionally change the makeup of the workforce for UCCs.

Presenter(s):

  • Cynthia Cook, University of Houston-Clear Lake (7,500 - 10,000)
  • Cindy Bruns,  10,001 - 15,000
  • Karen Hofmann, University of Central Florida 45,001+
  • Mollie Herman, Towson University 20,001 - 25,000

Panel discussion with attendee participation.

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Leadership / Management
  • Mental Health Trends
  • Other - Write In Training

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will identify key challenges facing doctoral internship training due to staff recruitment difficulties.
  • Participants will discuss and evaluate strategies for mitigating doctoral internship challenges.

MINDful College Connections: An Innovative, Partnership Approach to Student Mental Health
1.5 CE Hours

Description: The MINDful College Connections (MCC) program is an innovative, collaborative partnership between three colleges in Indiana.  Supporting student mental health and enrollment persistence has been a focus for institutions of higher education for years, with colleges and universities continuing to look for ways to meet the increasing demand for services with limited institutional resources.  Together, the MCC member institutions have developed a shared-resource consortium to comprehensively improve their capacity for offering mental health and wellness services for their students.  One facet of the program is that MCC has negotiated discounted consortium pricing with vendors to expand the variety of mental health and wellness resources and services available at all tiers of their stepped care treatment model.  Another facet is hiring additional MCC-funded counseling center staff for each campus, which are also shared at times to offer consortium-wide support.  Finally, MCC is designed to facilitate frequent consultation across the consortium to inform our continued development of best practices through institutional assessments, collaboration meetings, and professional development trainings.  This collaborative presentation will explore new opportunities for cross-institutional partnerships to support college student mental health, along with potential challenges and successes with doing so.

Presenter(s):

  • Curtis Wiseley, DePauw University (1,501 - 2,500)
  • Trevor Yuhas, DePauw University 1,501 - 2,500
  • Michael Latta, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology 1,501 - 2,500
  • Melissa Grinslade, Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College, Under 1,501

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Mental Health Trends
  • Outreach Programming / Prevention
  • Other - Write In Wellbeing Resources

Instructional Level: Advanced

Learning Objective(s):

  • Discuss the benefits of securing mental health and wellness vendor services through a consortium model.
  • Explain how counseling center staff can become shared resources across a consortium.
  • Identify opportunities for cross-institutional collaboration to support student mental health.

Reclaiming the narrative of college counseling: Ethical considerations while implementing a Comprehensive Collaborative Care Model
1.5 CE Hours

Description: No other mental health care system offers board access to a vital demographic at the time where significant concerns emerge or escalate. Despite these significant opportunities within our field, college mental health is often criticized by mainstream media and many stakeholders, leading some institutions to make uninformed decisions to alter or even replace their campus counseling models. This tendency has increased since the global events of 2020, resulting in the need for counseling directors to be skilled at articulating ethical considerations surrounding college mental health while advocating for effective innovations. This presentation is designed to equip attendees to take a proactive and ethical stance on issues such as expanding a counseling center's scope of care, improving crisis response, exploring the need for aftercare services, and collaborating with campus partners.

Presenter(s):

  • Eric Wood, Texas Christian University (10,001 - 15,000)

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Ethics / Law
  • Mental Health Trends
  • Political / Advocacy

Instructional Level: Introductory

Learning Objective(s):

  • Describe 4 key objectives within a comprehensive collaborative care model for college counseling centers.
  • Describe ethical considerations while implementing a collaborative care model on a college campus.

Rural Mental Health
1.5 CE Hours

Description: Rural individuals face unique challenges when attempting to receive treatment for serious mental illness and mental health care. This study utilized the Delphi method to engage rural community members in identifying and addressing critical issues related to mental healthcare delivery in their county.

Presenter(s):

  • Renee Weiss, Texas A&M University-Kingsville (5,001 - 7,500)

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Mental Health Trends

Instructional Level: Introductory

Learning Objective(s):

  • Discuss this study as it relates to rural mental health to demonstrate 
    • RQ1: What is the meaning of mental health?
    • RQ2: What are the most prominent factors that impact mental health?
    • RQ3: What are the perceived barriers to receiving mental health treatment

The Power in Being a Director:  Finding Comfort in Your Role
1.5 CE Hours

Description: The position of a counseling center director involves leadership both within a department and across campus, placing directors constantly in the role of a leader in their day to day work.  As a leader there is an inherent power differential in the relationship between the director and staff members.  As a therapist, one's training involved understanding the power dynamic with the client and working to ensure that this is minimized to facilitate treatment.  Ergo, Directors often find challenges with recognizing and owning the power they hold in their position.  The inner therapist is likely always present in a director and can contribute to the difficulty one experiences.  This presentation will focus on the power dynamic in the role of a counseling center director and how to improve one's comfort in their position.  Strategies that can be employed will be discussed and presented.  The presentation will also discuss the differences between various parts of the director position including leader, manager, expert and supervisor.  Finally, time will be allotted for attendees to engage in small group dialogue, so as to mutually learn from each other.

Presenter(s):

  • Micky Sharma, The Ohio State University (45,001+)
  • Sharon Mitchell, University at Buffalo (25,001 - 30,000)
  • Jihad Aziz, Virginia Commonwealth University (25,001 - 30,000)
  • Carla McCowan, University of Illinios at Urbana-Champaign (45,001+)

Topic(s):

  • Leadership / Management

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will gain knowledge about the power dynamic in the role of a counseling center director
  • Participants will identify strategies to improve their ability to navigate the impact of power in their working relationships
  • The roles of leader, manager, expert and supervisor will be defined and differentiated.

We survived and so will you: How two BIPOC women navigated the first year as  new directors at PWIs
1.5 CE Hours

Description: The directors of college counseling centers face challenges while leading their staff through the ever changing landscape of collegiate mental health. The call to meet the needs of their student population combined with attempts to meet the needs of the counseling center staff and administration, while simultaneously navigating social/political climates that may disproportionately affect BIPOC folx, women, and those from historically marginalized groups and there is the potential for the result to be burnt out. In this session, participants will connect with two BIPOC women directors on their experiences and how they engaged in self-care while working in predominantly white institutions, the challenges that they faced as both internal and external hires, and how participants can create their own self care plan while navigating through environments that may not be designed for you. In addition to presenters sharing their relatable experiences there will be the opportunity for discussion and experiential learning.

Presenter(s):

  • Jessica Mitchell-Corsino, Bowling Green State University (15,001 - 20,000)
  • Mirelva Colon, Bard College (1,501 - 2,500)

We will have group discussion and activity.

Topic(s):

  • Diversity, Equity & Inclusive Excellence
  • Leadership / Management
  • Self-care / Wellbeing

Instructional Level: Introductory

Learning Objective(s):

  • Attendees will be able to identify, discuss, and design their own self-care plan as they navigate challenging times in leadership.
  • Attendees will be identify obstacles that exist when a new director enters the position from both the external and internal candidacy.
  • Attendees will be able to describe lessons learned from the first year as directors and apply to their experiences as a director.

Elements of Excellence - Leadership 102: Leading from All Sides
1.5 CE Hours

Description: This is the second installment of the Elements of Excellence leadership series.  In this session, we will help directors identify and explore the different angles from which they view their work and articulate their mission. Directors may sometimes feel “stuck in the middle”, needing to strike the perfect balance between prioritizing student services, institutional expectations and staff needs. We will discuss tangible tools and techniques to use when managing in/out, up/down and everything in between. Additionally, we propose that directors should not shy away from their therapist identity when they lead, because our clinical skills can be very useful when translated appropriately and intentionally.  Group participation and sharing will be encouraged.

Presenter(s):

  • Anita Sahgal, University of South Florida - St. Petersburg campus (2,500 - 5,000)
  • Melissa Rotkiewicz, University of Massachusetts Amherst (25,000 - 35,000)
  • Vivian Barnette, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University (10,000 - 15,000)
  • Karen Singleton, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (10,000 - 15,000)

Topic(s):

Instructional Level:

Learning Objective(s):

  • Explore the different angles from which we must lead our departments
  • Identify the benefits and challenges of being “stuck in the middle”
  • Articulate how to translate clinical skills into management and leadership

Becoming a Comprehensive Trauma Informed Care Counseling Center: A Case Study
1.5 CE Hours

Description: For the first part of this decade, there has been increased attention on the presence of trauma and its impact on clients. There has been less focus, however, on the presence and impact of trauma on our clinical staff. The intersection of staff needs and student needs calls for the use of trauma informed care (TIC) principles throughout the counseling center. In this presentation I will provide a case study of our center's intentional process of implementing TIC practices. I will walk through the creation of a TIC committee, a needs assessment, policy and procedure reviews, staff training, clinical practices and documentation shifts, and our ongoing strategies for cementing TIC in our center. Additionally, I will discuss the barriers to implementing TIC. Participants will be encouraged to think through how the TIC principles can be operationalized within their centers.

Presenter(s):

  • Kimberly Gorman, Western Carolina University (10,001 - 15,000)

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Leadership / Management
  • Trauma

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will analyze ways that trauma informed care principles are operating within their centers.
  • Participants will identify at least two steps they can take to implement trauma informed care within their centers.

Grant Writing: What, like it's hard?
1.5 CE Hours

Description: So you are interested in grant writing, or....you have been volun-told to "look into it"? Yet, don't have any idea on how to begin? Come join this presentation to learn the step by step process of one Director's experience in both successful (and unsuccessful) grant writing. This presentation will discuss overall grant writing and grant writing strategies to develop a proposal, using the SAMHSA Garrett Lee Smith Suicide Campus Prevention Grant as an example.

Presenter(s):

  • Teresa Michaelson -Chmelir, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (5,001 - 7,500)
  • Maureen Walls-McKay, Longwood University (2,501 - 5,000)

Learning Objectives:

  • List the the various types of available grants.
  • Apply new knowledge to create a SAMHSA grant proposal.
  • Articulate five tips for grant writing success.

Topics: Outreach Programming / Prevention
Instructional Level: Introductory


Holding Space: Leading a Staff Team through Transition
1.5 CE Hours

Description: Whether you are an Interim Director in a transition, a Director new to a center, or a long term Director at a center, this session will explore the complexities of leading a team and acknowledge the realities of staff trauma and organizational history and their impact on present day management issues.  Finally, we will share practical skills and strategies to effectively lead through transition.

Presenter(s):

  • Andrea Lawson, Cal Poly State University (20,001 - 25,000)

Topic(s):

  • Leadership / Management

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will be able to identify three challenges staff teams may experience in a transition.
  • Participants will be able to discuss a leadership strategy to address staff challenges.
  • Participants will be able to apply experiences shared in the session to their own centers.

Topic(s):

  • Outreach Programming / Prevention

Instructional Level: Introductory

Learning Objective(s):

  • List the the various types of available grants.
  • Apply new knowledge to create a SAMHSA grant proposal.
  • Articulate five tips for grant writing success.

Thriving, DEI Climate, and Staff Retention in College Counseling Centers: Do Training Programs Make a Difference?
1.5 CE Hours

Description: This presentation will review the results and implications of a 2022 research study conducted on the impact training programs have on the retention of college counseling center staff. Our study aimed to identify how the presence of a training program impacts staff thriving, intent to leave, and feelings of inclusion/exclusion for counseling center staff. We surveyed college counseling center staff across the U.S. using an anonymous, online survey distributed via professional email list servs in 2022. The presentation will share the results of the study by describing the relationship between turnover intention and thriving, affective commitment, diversity climate, and inclusion/exclusion with the current sample. Additionally, the presentation will share results on the relationship between the presence of a training program and staff' turnover intention and how training programs contribute to perceptions of diversity climate and experiences of inclusion/exclusion among staff. The presentation will include a discussion on the application of findings on management/operational practices to promote retention of counseling center staff.

Presenter(s):

  • Debra Broderick, University of St. Thomas (10,001 - 15,000)
  • Stephanie Kendall, Suffolk University (7,500 - 10,000)

Topic(s):

  • Diversity, Equity & Inclusive Excellence
  • Leadership / Management

Instructional Level: Introductory

Learning Objective(s):

  • Describe the strength and direction of the relationship between training program and DEI climate, thriving, and turnover intention.
  • List 2-3 salient themes that impact counseling center staff well-being based on the qualitative results of the study.
  • Apply study findings related to thriving, DEI climate, and inclusion/exclusion to identify potential operational changes that may promote retention of counseling center staff.

Understanding the IACS Standards and the Benefits of IACS Accreditation in Collegiate Mental Health
1.5 CE Hours

Description: Members of the International Accreditation of Counseling Services (IACS) leadership team will discuss the IACS Standards and how to incorporate the standards into creation of counseling center policies and procedures. Whether a center is currently accredited or not, Clinical Directors are often in a leadership role in the implementation of practice. Gaining a deeper understanding of the IACS Standards can help advocate for and implement these standards of practice. The session will also describe the advantages and process of accreditation for those interested in obtaining accreditation for their university or college counseling centers, including its international growth. External peer reviews are seen as vital for accountability to demonstrate the high standards and quality of our services. IACS has long been dedicated to growing the visibility of college and university counseling centers through an evolving set of high professional standards, knowing that our success is driven in particular by higher education leadership knowing and engaging in these standards, thus addressing the fundamental value of accreditation. Our standards have recently been revised to reflect emerging trends in the field, including issues related to embedded staff, contracted services, peer review and teletherapy.

Presenter(s):

  • Paul Galvinhill, College of the Holy Cross (2,501 - 5,000)
  • William Burns, North Dakota State University (10,001 - 15,000)

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Leadership / Management

Instructional Level: Introductory

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will gain a deeper understanding of the IACS Standards and how centers can meet them.
  • Participants will discuss the advantages of having university and college counseling services accredited by IACS.
  • Participants will gain the tools to develop and present a strong argument for accreditation.

What Are Your Best Tips? - Exchanging Survive and Thrive Strategies for Counseling Service Directors and Centers
1.5 CE Hours

Description: When facing the many challenges we navigate every day as counseling service directors, learning from the collective wisdom and creative strategies and practices of our colleagues can be a game changer.  In this session, four directors will share their "top tips" -  specific policies, practices and strategies that have had the most positive impact on their centers and their own well being. Tips will relate to organization, efficiency, effective advocating, staff and director morale, increasing staff cohesiveness, and our own wellness and self care.  Audience members will be invited to share their top tips as well.

Presenter(s):

  • Wendy Freedman, Vassar College (1,501 - 2,500)
  • Christiane Mueller, The Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, NY (1,501 - 2,500)
  • Mirelva Colon, Bard College (1,501 - 2,500)
  • Marisa M. Moore, Marist College (5,001 - 7,500)

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Diversity, Equity & Inclusive Excellence
  • Leadership / Management
  • Self-care / Wellbeing
  • Political / Advocacy

Instructional Level: Introductory

Learning Objective(s):

  • Describe organizational strategies that will streamline administrative work and more effectively track center projects and responsibilities.
  • Explain successful techniques for advocating with higher administration and campus colleagues.
  • Name center practices that will improve director and staff morale and staff cohesiveness.

Elements of Excellence - Leadership 103: Supervising and Co-creating Center Culture for Staff Stability
1.5 CE Hours

Description: This is the third and final session of the E of E leadership series.  Many factors have been cited in counseling center staff turnover and poor recruitment, including high burnout, low compensation, and feelings of being overwhelmed and undervalued (Gorman & Scofield, 2023; Gorman et al., 2023; Parker & Horowitz, 2022).  The goal of this session is to help you walk away with some inspirations and strategies for supervising, managing, and co-creating center workplace culture in ways that foster staff sense of well-being, belonging, investment, and support even during hard times.  When a staff person’s inner work life is supported, they are often more proactive, creative, and engaged at work, and when salary increases aren’t possible, the “intangibles” may encourage them to stay (Amabile & Kramer, 2011; Walden et al., 2021).  We will address current field trends, research on leadership approaches, and strategies for developing a sustainable center culture and recruiting qualified candidates.  Spoiler alert:  there may even be some natural benefits to the director’s well-being and job satisfaction through the suggested frameworks.

Presenter(s):

  • Erin Vlach,  (Emeritus)
  • Frances Diaz, University of California, Irvine (35,000 - 45,000)
  • Erin Trujillo, Arizona State University (45,001+)
  • Nivia Fitzpatrick, Pepperdine University

Topic(s):

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Learning Objective(s):

  • Describe field trends, staff traits, leadership qualities, and aspects of center culture that influence engagement, longevity, and success of counseling center staff.
  • Identify leadership and supervision strategies to assist with creating a center culture that fosters the inner work life, creativity, and vitality of staff.
  • Identify strategies to assist with attracting candidates in position searches.

Director Self-Care with Comics
1.5 CE Hours

Description: Narrative therapy and expressive art therapy meet in the drawing of simple three panel comics. This experiential program will provide participants with an opportunity to explore and process themes from their professional lives using simple story telling with images and limited text. In other words, we are going to draw comics about things that have happened in our professional lives that still bug us and see if we can gain some insight. No drawing experience or aptitude is needed. Participants will be lead through the process from start (generating prompts and themes) to process (tips on drawing) to finished 3 panel comics. Come try something new, have some fun, and maybe pick up a new technique to use for self reflection. A small warning; you may find this to be so meaningful that you will want to learn more and even use this as a part of your therapy practice.

Presenter(s):

  • Kristen Gray, Hope College (NA/Emeritus)

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Self-care / Wellbeing

Instructional Level: Introductory

Learning Objective(s):

  • Differentiate between graphic medicine, cartoons that illustrate mental health concepts, and therapeutic use of drawing comics.
  • Experience the process of synthesizing an event into discrete, manageable moments to gain insights.

Harriett Copher Haynes Program: Practical Considerations for Recruitment and Retention of Clinicians of Minoritized Identities
1.5 CE Hours

Description: In 2021-2022,  the Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors (AUCCCD) released a survey that indicated turnover and recruitment difficulties in the counseling center profession. Data compiled by AUCCCD showed 78.1% of directors had difficulties recruiting for the open positions available in their centers in the past year (as compared to 51.3% in 2020-2021). Despite individual and institutional awareness of the inequity, promotion, and leadership of minoritized staff in counseling centers, the number of such staff remains low. This presentation explores the challenges to the recruitment, retention, and promotion of clinicians of minoritized identities among a sample of current and previous counseling center professionals of various minoritized identity groups. We will also provide practical considerations for counseling center directors to implement when recruiting and retaining clinicians of minoritized identities. Attendees will learn about the latest research and participate in interactive activities to discuss innovative ways to support and retain clinicians of minoritized identities at their respective centers.  

Presenters:

  • Kisha Bazelais, PhD, University of Miami
  • Mariesa S. Cruz-Tillery, PhD, Pace University
  • Johanna Malaga, PsyD, MIT
  • Amy S. Walker, PhD, Georgetown University in Qatar

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore the importance of and challenges in recruiting and retaining clinicians of minoritized identities. 
  • Identify factors that contribute to retention and attrition of clinicians of minoritized identities.
  • Identify one new practice your center can implement to retain clinicians of minoritized identities.

Helping a campus recover after a student dies by suicide
1.5 CE Hours

Description: The death of a student by suicide is devastating to the entire campus community. The counseling center often plays a vital role in the initial response to the campus students, faculty, and staff. Counseling centers are also usually tasked with continued efforts to help the campus mourn the loss of the student. This presentation will focus on how counseling centers can respond to campus needs after a student death by suicide. In addition, the presentation will discuss ways counseling centers can support faculty, staff, and other counseling center clinicians as they navigate the campus tragedy.

Presenter(s):

  • Meghan O'Meara, Thomas Jefferson University (7,500 - 10,000)
  • James Hagenbaugh, Thomas Jefferson University (7,500 - 10,000)
  • Deanna Nobleza,  (Emeritus)

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Leadership / Management
  • Self-care / Wellbeing
  • Trauma

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will be able to summarize intervention strategies that counseling centers can utilize in the initial days after a student dies by suicide.
  • Participants will be able to recognize the various reactions of clinicians and trainees who have had a patient die by suicide.
  • Participants will be able to identify multiple offices to partner with in ways they may previously not have identified.

Pivot to Mental Health Case Management on Campus:  Expectations for High Touch Student Experience and Wraparound Services
1.5 CE Hours

Description: When clinical demand and acuity continue to escalate on college campuses, counseling center staff have been asked to pivot and adapt models of service delivery, prior to, and through the COVID-19 pandemic.  Concurrently, many campuses promote a "high touch" student experience as enrollments grow, though there is often a disconnect between such expectations and available resources.  This session will explore the expectations of counseling centers to respond to an ever growing array of needs that many students bring to their college experience: including but not limited to, persistent mental illness, risks to self and others, hospitalization, trauma and taking medical leaves for mental health reasons (Shelesky, Weatherford & Silbert, 2016). Focus will be placed on strategies for building buy-in and managing some of the challenges associated with case management practices, allocated resources, risk management as well as staff retention and workload.

Presenter(s):

  • Alison W. Markson, Babson College (2,501 - 5,000)
  • Rosa Ament, Pace University (2,501 - 5,000)
  • Cassie Murphy, University of Central Oklahoma (10,001 - 15,000)

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Diversity, Equity & Inclusive Excellence
  • Effects of COVID-19
  • Ethics / Law
  • Leadership / Management
  • Mental Health Trends
  • Self-care / Wellbeing
  • Political / Advocacy
  • Suicide prevention

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Learning Objective(s):

  • To describe case management roles in and outside of college counseling centers  -To identify data collection practices for reporting purposes and clarify scope of practice
  • To identify ways case management can promote equity and inclusion
  • To identify campus stakeholders, roles, barriers, and strengths associated with case management and its impact on counseling center staff and retention

Promoting Mental Health through Enterprise-Wide Suicide Prevention Strategic Framework:  A Health Promoting University Initiative
1.5 CE Hours

Description: At The University of Alabama at Birmingham, the first Health Promoting University to sign the Okanagan Charter in the United States, the UAB Cares Suicide Prevention Initiative works to achieve the vision, "No matter who you are at UAB, there is help for you; there is hope for you."  In response to increasing concerns regarding the mental health and wellness of the student community UAB's President and additional leadership charged a multidisciplinary task force to provide recommendations for comprehensive plan for suicide prevention in 2018. The resulting recommendations and strategic planning were informed by data, national best practices, and public health theory. In 2019, the recommendations were accepted by UAB leadership and UAB Cares Initiative was formed.   This presentation provides guidance on needs assessment and survey development to construct evidence-based strategic frameworks that inform suicide prevention and wellness strategies unique to individual institutions. We will overview strategies to develop focused frameworks that are able to adapt to local, national, and international changes with the aim of continuously supporting students. Using this model of suicide prevention and wellness, institutions can strategically respond to the needs of the campus community to holistically support their well-being, productivity, and retention.

Presenter(s):

  • Angela Stowe, The University of Alabama at Birmingham (20,001 - 25,000)

Topic(s):

  • Leadership / Management
  • Outreach Programming / Prevention
  • Political / Advocacy
  • Suicide prevention

Instructional Level: Introductory

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will know what it means to be a Health Promoting University, including adopting the Okanagan Charter
  • Participants will learn the systematic and comprehensive process of a task force at one institution to identify recommendations for a collaborative, campus-wide suicide prevention strategy.
  • Participants will learn about the key strategies that were implemented by a Suicide Prevention Leadership and Implementation Team and the progress of the work over a period of 4 years.

Staff Meetings: The Power (and Opportunity) is in Our Hands
1.5 CE Hours

Description: For many employees, staff meeting is one of the least favorite parts of the job. Depending on your place of employment and its culture, staff meetings might be full of dry informational updates (the "this meeting could have been an email" phenomenon), or they might be wrought with interpersonal conflict and feelings. Many managers, particularly those in social sector organizations, struggle to find that "just right" balance of making space for both information sharing and emotional processing to foster effective, efficient, and satisfying staff meetings. This presentation evolved from a conversation between Directors where we realized we often dread the very staff meetings we run "“ and we wanted to discover why! In this session, we will provide tools to evaluate what might not be working in your own staff meetings. We will explore key components to designing and facilitating successful staff meetings, looking to models and data from the business world and the social sector. We will discuss factors to consider as Directors think of implementing these components in their own centers, including potential impacts and interplay of staff composition (i.e., size, discipline, demographics); center mission, vision, and values; staff and university culture; community expectations; and availability of resources.

Presenter(s):

  • Melissa Rotkiewicz, University of Massachusetts (30,001 - 35,000)
  • Deborah Levans, Rhode Island School of Design (1,501 - 2,500)

Topic(s):

  • Leadership / Management

Instructional Level: Introductory

Learning Objective(s):

  • Identify the purpose(s) and goal(s) of staff meetings at your own center.
  • Identify and analyze aspects of staff meetings that detract from their purpose and, therefore, enjoyment.
  • Explore components of successful staff meetings.

 

Elements of Excellence - Postvention in Context: Translating Best Practices in Postvention to the Unique Needs of Each Suicide Response
1.5 CE Hours

Description: Postvention design and response following the death of a student by suicide has well founded ethics and practices written in collaboration by researchers, leaders and practitioners working in higher education.  Implementing best practices into the particular context of each campus and each event remains a critical skill of Counseling Center Directors. Frequently, campus leaders look to Counseling Center Directors for both emotional strength as well as postvention expertise. Understanding foundations of a safe and supportive postvention response is a critical knowledge base for all UCC Directors. For many, this is learning on the job, which can be incredibly complicated and nuanced. This session will help orient directors who are new to Higher Education on the resources that exist to understand foundations of postvention, highlighting higher education, psychology and journalism guidelines. Additionally, participants will engage in dialogue about all the ways that context matters in a postvention response, with examples given where leaders need to make complicated decisions in what is best for their communities in context.

Presenter(s):

  • Karen Singleton, Massachusetts Institute of Technology ()
  • Erin Trujillo, 

Topic(s):

Instructional Level: Introductory

Learning Objective(s):

  • Review foundations on postvention best practices from higher education sources.
  • Identify areas of postvention that require contextual knowledge and decision making.
  • Describe internal to center factors to consider when moving through postvention with a student who was a client.

Controlling the Narrative by Working with the Media
1.5 CE Hours

Description: Counseling Centers have not always enjoyed positive publicity. While this is due to a number of factors, Counseling Center directors have been reticent to address the negative narratives cycling in the national news. This workshop is geared to helping directors to take control of the narrative. Working with the media can also offer a wide range of benefits to directors and their organizations. By communicating a message through different media channels, directors can reach a larger audience and garner resources for their Center more effectively.  Working with the media allows for: 

  1. Increased visibility: Working with the media can increase visibility and promote their Counseling Center and its work to a wider audience.
  2. Credibility: When directors work with the media, they gain credibility through third-party endorsements. Being featured in a news article, TV segment, or radio interview can establish expertise and reputation.
  3. Crisis management: In times of crisis, working with the media can help directors control the narrative. By providing accurate information and responding quickly to media inquiries, directors can address concerns and maintain trust. Attendees of this workshop will prepare for and participate in a media interview, learn about resources to use in the interview, and identify appropriate press outlets.

Presenter(s):

  • Richard Shadick, Pace University-NYC (7,500 - 10,000)
  • Danielle Oakley, (Emeritus)
  • Sonya Ford, American University of Antigua (Under 1,500)
  • Gary Glass, Oxford College of Emory University (Under 1,500)

Topic(s):

  • Outreach Programming / Prevention
  • Political / Advocacy

Instructional Level: Introductory

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will be able to list the benefits of working with the media
  • Attendees will be able to explain the steps needed to prepare and participate in a media interview

Emeritus Program: Going Back in Service of the Future: Emeriti Perspectives on Counseling Centers' Path Forward During this time of Transition and Change in our Profession
1.5 CE Hours

Description: Counseling centers are impacted evermore by prescribed changes at their institutions as campuses wrestle with increased demand for mental health services in the context of constrained resources. AUCCCD has produced a 2023 position paper with specific recommendations to guide counseling centers in defining their focus, guiding re-organization, and supporting positive role transitions. In this interactive session, a panel of Emeriti directors will speak to experiences with and strategies for greater success in implementation of these recommendations, sharing lessons learned in overcoming challenges with a focus on key topics including: recruitment and retention of staff, service demand/utilization/capacity, delivery models, resource allocation, third party vendors, and salaries.

Presenter(s):

  • Susan Prieto-Welch, Retired from Purdue University (NA/Emeritus)
  • Louise Douce, Retired from The Ohio State University (Emeritus)
  • Gregory Snodgrass, Retired from Texas State University (Emeritus)
  • Brian Mistler,  (Emeritus)
  • Patti Fleck (Emeritus)

Topic(s):

  • Diversity, Equity & Inclusive Excellence
  • Leadership / Management
  • Mental Health Trends
  • Self-care / Wellbeing

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will be able to identify at least three examples of campus-wide strategic plans that could be used as resources for developing a mental health strategic plan for their campus, and will learn about strategies that have been successfully employ
  • Based upon the experiences of Emeriti directors, participants will learn strategies that can be employed to promote campus-wide awareness of student mental health challenges and proactive investment in addressing these challenges.
  • Participants will learn at least four strategies that have been successfully employed by Emeriti directors to reduce staff burnout, promote staff retention, and nurture a positive workplace culture.

Highlights from the 2021-2022 AUCCCD Directors' Survey
1.5 CE Hours

Description: For over fifteen years the Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors has been tracking collegiate mental health policy and practice trends to assist counseling center directors with benchmarking data in key operational areas to guide informed leadership. The survey's flexibility has led to informed collaborations with critical professional allies. 395 counseling center directors completed the 2021-2022 AUCCCD directors' survey, providing a wealth of information on utilization, counseling services, staffing models, relationships to the overall campus community. A separate salary survey was used to obtain information about director and staff demographics and salary information.  This workshop will present highlights from the survey as well as deeper dives into utilization trends and center models, severity of mental health concerns pre-post covid, staffing challenges, and relationships between counseling center and their institutions. The workshop will also allow for discussion of survey data with participants and ideas for future survey items.

Presenter(s):

  • Cindy Bruns, Central Washington University (10,001 - 15,000)
  • Kimberly Gorman, Western Carolina University (15,001 - 20,000)
  • Nivla Fitzpatrick, Pepperdine University (10,001 - 15,000)
  • Karen Sokolowski, University of Albany (15,001 - 20,000)

 

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Effects of COVID-19
  • Leadership / Management
  • Mental Health Trends

Instructional Level: Introductory

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will analyze the current survey data highlights in order to be able to articulate this information to their campus constituents.
  • Participants will discuss national trends in utilization, severity of mental health concerns, and demand management strategies.
  • Participants will analyze staffing challenges and trends in university and community college counseling centers.

IACS Site Visitor Training
1.5 CE Hours

Description: This training is designed to present a comprehensive overview of the policies and procedures involved in conducting an IACS site visit. It is opened to individuals whose counseling centers are accredited by IACS and who desire to be trained as IACS site visitors. In addition, it is also recommended for current visitors who have not attended  previous training, and for those who would like to update their knowledge of the site visit process.  Competencies to be reviewed include organizing the visit schedule, conducting interviews wit various personnel, applying the IACS Standards to the review, responding to typical critical incidents that may occur, writing the report, developing appropriate recommendations, and accessing and uploading reports to the IACS drive.

Presenter(s):

  • Anika Fields, Florida A&M University (7,500 - 10,000)
  • Cynthia Cook, University of Houston-Clear Lake 7,500 - 10,000

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Ethics / Law
  • Other - Write In Training

Instructional Level: Introductory

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will identify the critical elements of a site visit and understand their place in the overall review process.
  • Participants will describe the organization of a typical onsite and virtual review including establishing the schedule, maintaining an appropriate role, investigating concerns identified by the application reviewers, conducting interviews with individuals
  • Participants will describe how the site visit fits into the overall review process; describe the organization of the site visit report, including relating the report to the IACS Standards; develop appropriate recommendations, and determine the overall recommendation.

Money, Money, Money: The ABBA's (or ABC's) of Financial Literacy for Non-Financially Oriented Directors
1.5 CE Hours

Description: Few of us come to our director positions with knowledge of financial reports, profit and loss statements, or budgeting preparation skills.  Yet we are expected to have a grasp of these concepts on the first day we step into our role.  Without an MBA or accounting background, how can we best understand the reports provided to us by our colleagues in finance and budgeting departments?  How do we make the most of funds we have available for counseling center initiatives, staff professional development, or hardware such as computers and furniture?  What makes a good budget proposal for new staff, initiatives, or funding enhancements?  Join two experienced (but non-financially oriented) directors as they walk through and interpret financial reports and discuss how to use the information to design budgets for enhanced initiatives and staffing.  The presenters invite you to bring copies of the financial reports you receive from your institution's financial colleagues with your questions and conundrums.  While any director is likely to benefit from a review of the financial elements of running a center, this presentation is designed for directors with limited experience designing and understanding budgets.

Presenter(s):

  • Scott Strader, University of South Florida - Tampa (35,001 - 45,000)
  • Ernesto Escoto, University of Florida (45,001+)

Topic(s):

  • Leadership / Management

Instructional Level: Introductory

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will discuss the intricacies of the financial reports and documents they receive as counseling center directors.
  • Participants will identify the elements of creating a budget for new programs or initiatives, including managing the budget cycle within your institution.
  • Participants will identify tips on reviewing lengthy financial reports when working with limited working hours.

Preventing Staff Burnout: Organizational Strategies, Therapeutic Presence, and Inclusive Culture
1.5 CE Hours

Description: Burnout must be prevented at the level of the organization, not just relying on individual strategies or self-care. What can we first do as managers and leaders to support our clinical staff? As directors, we create a holding space for our staff as they do the same for their clients and trainees. In this presentation, we will discuss supporting staff wellness in ways that promote inclusive culture and retention. Recent empirical research on counselor burnout will be reviewed. We will focus on three areas for burnout prevention at the level of the counseling center: a) organizational strategies, b) therapeutic presence, and c) inclusive center culture. Implementing organizational strategies includes attuning to the needs of staff and the team. Coaching therapeutic presence includes training  staff to remain grounded and aware of their own needs. Supporting inclusive culture includes moving away from white supremacy culture and adapting burnout prevention to fit identity differences of staff. Participants should leave with a deeper understanding of leadership, training, and organizational culture strategies to prevent burnout in their clinical staff.

Presenter(s):

  • Katharine Hahn Oh, John Carroll University (2,501 - 5,000)
  • Brittany Sommers, Cleveland State University 15,001 - 20,000

 

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Diversity, Equity & Inclusive Excellence
  • Leadership / Management

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Learning Objective(s):

  • Discuss recent empirical research on counselor burnout
  • Explain organizational strategies to prevent staff burnout and identify which ones might be helpful for your workplace, including ways you can create a more inclusive culture
  • Describe strategies for training or coaching staff in therapeutic presence

 

Elements of Excellence - Operationalizing Equity into Counseling Center Work: Challenges, Opportunities & “Successes”
1.5 CE Hours

Description: Operationalizing equity-based values into the work of counseling centers is essential for promoting social justice on our campuses. Doing so, however, presents numerous ethical, personal, institutional and socio-political challenges and opportunities that need to be identified, examined and strategically navigated.

This presentation will examine these challenges and opportunities in the context of staff management, scope of service,  campus advocacy, and institutional and socio-political dynamics. Panelists will also describe the conceptualization, development, and implementation of a “successful” scope of service model that is informed by equity and justice.

Discussion will focus on how directors can begin to conceptualize and actualize equity into their own counseling centers and campuses.

Presenter(s):

  • Jeffrey Ng, Fordham University (15,001 - 20,000)
  • Rich Yoakum, Samford University (5,001 - 10,000)
  • Nivla Fitzpatrick, Pepperdine University (10,001 - 15,000)

Topic(s):

Instructional Level: Introductory

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will develop a theoretical and operational definition of equity in the context of their own roles, identities and experiences.
  • Participants will identify and examine personal, departmental, institutional and socio-political challenges with integrating equity into their own counseling centers.
  • Participants will identify opportunities and strategies for infusing equity at their own counseling centers.

A Year in Review: What I wish I Knew During my First Year as Director
1.5 CE Hours

Description: This session will reflect upon things I wish I had known as a new director. Over the last year, I have built a program from the ground up at a private university with 1500 students. The session will explore key players in the success of Counseling Services, such as athletics, faculty, and SGA. An understanding of the ethical implications and benefits of engaging with a CARE/BIT team on campus. Scope of practice will be discussed, which impacts the types of services and trainings that Counseling Service departments can and should engage in. Lastly, this session will explore useful resources for new directors, including local, state, and national resources.

Presenter(s):

  • Caroline Gimarc, Mount Mercy University (Under 1,500)

 

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Outreach Programming / Prevention

Instructional Level: Introductory

Learning Objective(s):

  • Identify three contacts on campus to ally with.
  • Utilize one resource at the local, state, and national level.

Disrupting the Grind - Finding Liberation through Rest
1.5 CE Hours

Description: In a landscape with constrained budgets, staffing issues, and enormous pressure from the entire campus community, the idea of rest seems like a fantasy. Our culture demands excellence as defined by productivity despite rest and "taking a break" being one of the first-line interventions we utilize with distressed students and colleagues. While we may be effective at identifying opportunities for rest for others, challenges abound when we are invited to cultivate a culture of rest within ourselves and, by extension, our Centers. At its core, rest is an opportunity to disrupt white supremacy's subtle and overt narratives. It requires us to compassionately examine how "the grind" shows up in our lives and how we may grind others. The presenter will share insights from the difficult conversations in her agency with staff for cultural change, provide space to process and explore the challenges of giving up a reinforced identity of productivity and identify how directing through rest can lead to empowerment and humanity.

Presenter(s):

  • Kodee Walls, Kansas State University (15,001 - 20,000)

Topic(s):

  • Diversity, Equity & Inclusive Excellence
  • Leadership / Management
  • Self-care / Wellbeing
  • Political / Advocacy

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will assess three ways white supremacy shows up in their professional life and identity.
  • Participants will create two interventions to infuse rest into their organization's culture.
  • Participants will be able to apply a model of directing that is grounded in an anti-racism lens to navigate the human need for restoration.

The Psychology of Stalking: A discussion of Stalker Types and Interventions
1.5 CE Hours

Description: This presentation will focus on helping directors to understand stalking and why college students may be vulnerable to engaging in and being victims of stalking. Additionally, the presentation will review the different typologies of individuals who engage in stalking behaviors and management strategies for each typology. Finally, the presentation will help directors develop interventions that can be used with students who have been victims of stalking

Presenter(s):

  • Jamie Hagnebaugh, Thomas Jefferson University (7,500 - 10,000)

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Violence

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Learning Objective(s):

  • Recognize the different typologies of stalkers
  • Explain reasons why college students are prone to engage in stalking behaviors
  • Identify interventions that can be used to manage individuals who engage in stalking behaviors

The Role of the Counseling Center in Leading and Supporting Population-Level University-Wide Mental Health Promotion and Support:  A Health Promoting University Approach
1.5 CE Hours

Description: This presentation will share one Health Promoting University's approach in utilizing a public health framework for mental health promotion and support on campus.  As counseling centers regroup and reassess mental health of students after the pandemic and moving forward, we have the opportunity to influence campus-wide culture in moving toward a Culture of Care and Thriving in addition to providing individual counseling support to students who are struggling and in need of mental health care.  Strategies will be presented that have been implemented on the population level, such as the use of digital platforms and mental health promotion campaigns.  Additionally, strategies will be shared that address the relationship and individual levels for training faculty, staff, and leadership to shift from automatically referring struggling students to the counseling center to learning how to embed mental health in teaching and 1-1 interactions with the students they serve on the front end.   Presenter will share the process toward building this framework and culture on campus as well as the individual strategies at each level.

Presenter(s):

  • Angela Stowe, The University of Alabama at Birmingham (20,001 - 25,000)

Topic(s):

  • Effects of COVID-19
  • Leadership / Management
  • Mental Health Trends
  • Outreach Programming / Prevention

Instructional Level: Introductory

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will know what it means to be a Health Promoting University, including adopting the Okanagan Charter
  • Participants will understand the social-ecological public health framework
  • Participants will know one school's implementation of population-level mental health promotion strategies; participants will know one school's implementation of relationship and individual strategies to equip campus faculty, staff, and leadership to share

Elements of Excellence - Too Many Cooks in the Kitchen: Best Practices Around Managing Outside Partners/ Resources
1.5 CE Hours

Description: In response to increased service demand and acuity of mental health concerns among college students (Gorman et al., 2022), some universities have begun to allow offices and departments outside of the counseling center to hire their own mental health providers, sometimes without the input of the counseling center. Additionally, with the growing role of Wellness Departments on campuses which may offer peer counselors or wellness coaching sessions, counseling centers are navigating new territory in defining their roles and collaborating with these areas. 

This program will address some of the concerns these decentralized counseling offices or wellness offerings can present. For example, potential challenges may include: the ethical considerations involved in managing these relationships, recordkeeping and confidentiality requirements, crisis protocols, as well as malpractice insurance.   We will also consider the role of telehealth companies as outside partners and the ways schools have managed these relationships effectively.

Presenter(s):

  • Cary Bosak, Sarah Lawrence College (1,500 - 2,500)
  • Calvin Chin, Princeton University 5,001 - 10,000
  • ValaRay Irvin, Southern University at Baton Rouge 5,001 - 10,000
  • Anita Sahgal, University of South Florida - St. Petersburg 2,501 - 5,000

Topic(s):

Instructional Level:

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will reflect on the ethical considerations involved in partnering with decentralized counseling services on their campuses.
  • Participants will learn about best practices in managing clinical dilemmas involved in working with mental health professionals outside of the counseling center.
  • Participants will reflect on ways Wellness departments supplement, compliment, or challenge the work of counseling centers.

Developing Secure Teams
1.5 CE Hours

Description: What do you value most in being a part of a team? Have you wondered what conditions allow you to lead a team effectively? This program will focus on how to develop teams who feel secure in their leadership. A conversation on establishing healthy boundaries for employees, as well as how to impart that to the students we interact with will take place. Factors that create health and security within a system will be covered.   The audience will discuss a variety of leadership and communication styles. Consideration of those differences and how to effectively engage in interpersonal relationships will be addressed. The participants will explore finding a balance between building value and team building. Skills developed in this program will leave your team feeling empowered to serve future generations.

Presenter(s):

  • Melissa Sulkowski,  (2,501 - 5,000)

 

Topic(s):

  • Leadership / Management

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Learning Objective(s):

  • The audience will be able to identify the four pillars of emotional intelligence.
  • The audience will be able to describe what factors allow teams to feel secure and thrive.
  • The audience will be able to explain how different leadership and communication styles can be optimized on a team.

Navigating Chronic Health Conditions as Counseling Center Directors: Ethical Considerations
1.5 CE Hours

Description: The ethics codes for our various mental health disciplines make it clear that we must take reasonable steps to prepare for circumstances that would impact our ability to fulfill our duties as providers. This panel discussion explores ethical considerations specific to counseling center directors. Panelists examine the impacts of chronic health conditions on their work relationships and leadership styles. Additionally, we consider the importance of self-care and wellbeing practices. Finally, we offer helpful guidance for fellow directors living with health concerns to mitigate the impact not only on the populations we serve but also on our own health.

Presenter(s):

  • Keilan Rickard, Emory University (15,001 - 20,000)
  • Rekha M. Varghese, Hope College (2,501 - 5,000)
  • Vivian D. Barnette, North Carolina A&T University (10,001 - 15,000)
  • Allison C. Peters, California State University San Marcos (10,001 - 15,000)

Topic(s):

  • Ethics / Law
  • Leadership / Management
  • Self-care / Wellbeing

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Learning Objective(s):

  • Attendees will be able to articulate the ethical imperative to prepare for illness.
  • Participants will be able to name at least three ways chronic health conditions impact the work of counseling center directors.
  • Attendees will be able to list at least three ways to mitigate the impacts of chronic health conditions.

Please Don't Call Us Superheroes: Avoiding the Trap of Mission Based Gaslighting
1.5 CE Hours

Description: Many counseling professionals gain an incredible sense of pride and identity from their work within the helping profession. Unfortunately, our altruism has often been used as a reason we should not ask for things that other professionals take for granted. Indeed, the adage of "no one does this job for the money" has been greatly misused over the years as a way to shut down valid discussions about salaries, work load, flexibility, etc. Mission based gaslighting is a term coined to describe this type of rhetoric at work and it has become especially troublesome in light of the COVID 19 pandemic, the Great Resignation and meeting the increased needs of our communities with less and less resources. In this session, Directors will learn how to identify the loaded language of mission based gaslighting and develop concrete strategies for challenging those messages.

Presenter(s):

  • Jessica Heavin, Tulsa Community College (15,001 - 20,000)

Topic(s):

  • Leadership / Management

Instructional Level: Introductory

Learning Objective(s):

  • Identify the language synonymous with mission based gaslighting
  • Discuss strategies to dismantle mission based gaslighting both within our teams and externally.

Seeing Through the Numbers: Using data to decrease wait times and increase staff wellness regardless of utilization rates and size of staff
1.5 CE Hours

Description: This program will assist counseling center directors in bringing down wait times for servicesby a comprehensive review of simple and easily accessible set of numbers such as clinical FTEs, average number of sessions per client, and percentage of clients in 1-5 and 6+ sessions. The session will also discuss how to utilize this data to inform administrators and students about your center's efforts to keep wait times at a minimum.

Presenter(s):

  • Timothy Silvestri, Muhlenberg College (1,501 - 2,500)

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Leadership / Management
  • Suicide prevention

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will be able to utilize data to produce minimal wait times throughout the academic year, regardless of staff size.
  • Participants will learn how to communicate effectively their scope of practice to students, administration, and faculty.
  • Participants will learn how to create greater staff cohesion and buy-in around the center's scope of practice.